Additonal Information - Spaceships in Detail

Feilans have finally entered the realm of space in their solar system, a vast area, full of exotic planets and phenomena. The colonies created by the old Edwinish Party have developed into a new faction, the Dmitrians, whom are descended from Feilans, but whom have developed a separate cultural identity from their colonial forefathers. At the edge of the system lurks the formidable faction known as the Immortals, a group of furs whom have used technology to live forever, in a constant state of hostility with Feila and Dmitri, both of whom are on tense enough relations as it is. All natives are furry (Skin Avian are present here too). No native humans.
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JamesG
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Additonal Information - Spaceships in Detail

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Note: This information is not compulsory reading to use the Space Age. This is Feila 'canon' in regards to the operation of spacecraft, however users may invent different methods of operation for their own spacecraft.

The Spacefarer's Guide to Spacecraft Mechanics


Contents

1. Introduction
2. Know Your Spacecraft
3. Procedures


1. Introduction

Welcome to The Spacefarer's Guide to Spacecraft Mechanics. This book will give you all the information you need to understand the workings of a modern spaceship. On behalf of Feilan Intrasolar, we congratulate you on your first step towards the stars. However, we must remind you that this book should only be used as a reference, and any fittings or modifications to a spacecraft must be done by a qualified engineer.


2. Know Your Spacecraft

Below is a list and description of common components in a modern spaceship. Note that depending on your spaceship type, you may not have some parts, or multiple parts. The components are all categorised thus:

Powers: - What is dependant on the component.
Depends Upon: - What the component needs to run.
Connected To: - What other components is it connected to.
Dangers: -Some components may be dangerous. If this is the case, the symbols below will be used to explain.

Image = Nuclear Hazard
Image = Fire Hazard
Image = Explosive Hazard
Image = Electrical Hazard
Image = Moving Parts Hazard


Engines - Engines are a vital part of your spacecraft. Not only do they provide nearly all motive power, they generate electricity and power other important ship systems.

Powers:
Life Support
Primary Electric Generators
Movement

Depends Upon:
Fuel Source

Connected To:
Damage Control Panel
Engine Panel

Dangers:ImageImageImageImageImage


Life Support System - The Life Support System ensures the constant survival and comfort of the spaceship's occupants. It controls temperature, sanitation, nutrition, atmosphere and scanning crew vitals to ensure their continued safety.

Powers:
Thermostats
Oxygen-Nitrogen Cycle
Food Supply
Hydration Supply
Vitals Scan
Wireless Repair and Automated Sanitation Servicers


Depends Upon:
Primary Electrical Generators
Engines
Battery

Connected To:
Damage Control Panel
Life Support Panel

Dangers: ImageImage


Primary Electric Generators - These are turbines connected to the engines, that provide the main electrical power for the spacecraft and many of its systems, on what is called the 'Main Grid'. Some components do not rely on the Main Grid for power, and draw power from a 'Sub-Grid' when in use.

Powers:
Main Grid
Sub-Grid

Depends Upon:
Engines

Connected To:
Flight Deck - Damage Control Panel
Flight Deck - Engine Panel

Dangers: ImageImageImageImage


Batteries - The Batteries are used for emergency power should the engines fail. Their most common use is to start and re-start engines. There are Battery systems for both the Main Grid and Sub-Grids of electric power.

Powers:
Main Grid (Emergency)
Sub-Grid (Emergency)

Depends Upon:
Non-Dependant Component

Connected To:
Flight Deck - Emergency Panel

Dangers: Image

Secondary Electric Generators - Solar Array - The Solar Array is used in an extreme emergency in which the Primary Electric Generators and the Batteries have failed.

Powers:
Emergency Grid ONLY - A completely independent circuit that will ONLY power Communications and Flight Control for microthrusters and Flight Surfaces. Pilots should rely on non-electric flight instruments for a heading.
Depends Upon:
The Sun
Connected To:
Flight Deck - Emergency Panel
Dangers: Image

Sensor Array - The Sensor Array is a selection of external sensors the vessel uses to detect other traffic, stations and foreign objects.

Powers:
Omni-Detection and Ranging
Infra-Red Scanner
Electromagnetic Field Scanner
External Closed-Circuit Television Cameras

Depends Upon:
Primary Electric Generators

Connected To:
Flight Deck - Sensor Panel

Dangers:Image

Flight Surfaces - The Flight Surfaces are any surfaces of the spaceship that are used to control its flight in atmosphere. This may not apply to all spacecraft.

Powers::
Atmospheric Flight

Depends Upon:
Primary Electric Generators

Connected To:
Flight Deck - Flight Controls

Dangers: Image

Communications Array - The Communications Array allows ships to communicate with each other and any stations or flight towers.

Powers:
Communication in Space

Depends Upon:
Primary Electric Generators

Connected To:
Flight Deck - Communications Panel


3. Procedures

This chapter aims to assist the spacefarer with standard procedures in relation to events whilst travelling in space. This is particularly useful in the event that communication with a control tower or other spaceship is impossible. However, by law, all spacecraft are obliged to assist any other vessels in distress.


1. Engine Emergencies

In the event of an engine fire, failure or other anomaly, the procedure as follows will reduce risk to the ship and its crew.

1. Find the ENGINE PANEL
2. Any engine damage will cause a red light over the Emergency Stop panel to illuminate. Press in the corresponding button to the engine.
3. If the ENGINE FIRE light has illuminated, find the Fire Panel
4. Press the corresponding engine number on the panel to the engine on fire.


2. Sensor Emergencies

In the event that your sensors fail, the following procedures are standard in order to prevent collisions with other spacecraft.

Procedure for Sensor Failure within Space Station Control:

1. STOP the Spacecraft relative to your nearest station
2. Contact the station's control tower to report situation
3. Set external strobe lights to EMERGENCY
4. Wait for repair vessel to dock and repair/replace the sensors
5. Proceed once sensors are calibrated

Procedure for Sensor Failure outside Space Station Control:

1. Alter course to NEAREST space station or spacecraft.
2. Announce the situation over standard communication frequencies to warn any other spacecraft.
3. Follow the above procedure once within a space station's area of control


3. Communication Emergencies

In the event your communications array fails, it is important to notify the nearest station for repairs. Communications are vital to safe space travel.

Procedure for Communications Failure within Space Station Control:

1. STOP the Spacecraft relative to your nearest station, unless doing so would result in a collision
2. Set external strobe lights to EMERGENCY
3. Launch on-board shuttle to space station in order to alert repair services
4. Wait for repair vessel to dock and repair/replace the communications array
5. Proceed once communications are re-established

Procedure for Communications Failure outside Space Station Control:

1. Alter course to NEAREST space station or spacecraft.
2. Follow above procedure
3. If you have found another spacecraft, launch on-board shuttle to spacecraft in order to alert them to the situation, and to render assistance.


4. Power Emergencies

Normally, the engines provide power to the Primary Electric Generators, however if for some reason the engines or Generators fail, this procedure is standard:

1. Attempt Generator diagnostic. The ship's wiring has several 'junction points' which are able to verify whether or not there is a break between two in a row. This allows the ship's repair crew or Wireless Repair and Automated Sanitation Servicers (WRASSs) to locate any wiring breaks.
2. Make certain the POWER SUPPLY is set to OFF before attempting re-wiring.
3. If no wiring fault is found, that is if the engines have failed, set Batteries to ON.
4. Communicate to any nearby station or spacecraft the situation
5. Set external strobe lights to EMERGENCY
6. In case of Battery failure, set Solar Array to ON


5. Life Support Emergencies

1. Air

In the event of a life-support Air emergency, oxygen masks may drop down from the ceiling in all habitable areas of the vessel. These masks will begin air supply once firmly pulled down and placed over the muzzle. Make certain to breathe normally and remain calm. IF this does not occur automatically, follow the procedure below:

1. Find the Emergency Panel and press Manual Oxygen Mask Release
2. In case of mask failure, direct all crew to the Emergency Supply storage areas of the vessel, where air tanks may be located.

2. Temperature

In the event of a life-support Temperature emergency, the spacecraft computer will allow the pilot to manually compensate by remotely activating all heaters in the case of an abnormal temperature drop, and will allow the remote closing of all window shutters and activation of air conditioning in the event of an abnormal temperature rise.

Procedure in the case of abnormal temperature rise:

1. Find the Emergency Panel and set all window shutters to CLOSED. This prevents sunlight from entering the vessel.
2. Set Air Condition to MANUAL
3. Set Temperature

Procedure in the case of abnormal temperature fall:

1. Find the Emergency Panel and set all window shutters to OPEN. This allows a moderated amount of sunlight to enter the vessel.
2. Set Air Condition to MANUAL
3. Set Temperature

3. Food and Water

Most spacecraft carry Emergency Supply storage, which allows a crew sufficient air, water and basic food supplies that may be consumed without need of any electrical appliance, in order to be used in the event of the vessel taking a longer course than expected, or in the event of an emergency. Rationing is strongly advised in all circumstances. The amount of supplies may vary with the vessel type, ranging from months to years worth of emergency supply.

4. Medical Emergency

Any outbreak of disease MUST be Quarantined with immediate effect. On-board doctors and nurses must take precautions to avoid catching any disease. First Aid kits are dispersed within most spacecraft. Refer to your on-board doctor for more information.


6. Emergency Entry

In the unlikely event that your spacecraft is required to make an emergency entry into a planet's atmosphere, the pilot must consider the following points:

- Flight Surfaces: Is your spacecraft equipped with wings, elevators or rudders for atmospheric flight?

- Engines: Do your spacecraft's engines function in atmosphere?

- Angle of Descent: At what angle will the spacecraft hit the atmosphere?

- The Landing Area: At what location is it safe to land? Are any towns, cities or colonies in significant danger?

The above can easily be remembered by the acronym, 'F.E.A.T', as it will take a feat of great skill on the pilot's behalf to make a wholly successful emergency entry into atmosphere.

Procedure in the case of emergency entry into atmosphere:

1. Check Hydraulics are operational for flight surfaces

2. Check Engines can maintain thrust output in atmosphere

3. Check Minimum and Maximum velocities the spacecraft is rated for in atmosphere.

4. Check Sensor Array for appropriate Angle of Descent

Procedure to land:

1. Lower Landing Gear (If Applicable)

2. Extend Flaps to Full

3. Keep to assigned landing velocity

4. Align to runway (If Applicable)

5. Set Landing Lights to ON

6. Set external strobe lights to EMERGENCY

7. Declare an Emergency over local communications channels

8. Don't sink.

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